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Students exposed to new ideas, opportunities

03.27.12

 

An expert from AECOM explains the work his form is doing at the site of the World Trade CenterFrom window coverings to child care to the latest in 'green' energy innovation, students at Tech Valley High School were exposed on Monday to some of the top innovative fields in the Capital Region.

Representatives from Comfortex Window Fashions, the Capital District Child Care Council, AECOM, New York State Energy Research & Development Authority (NYSERDA), Sage College of Albany – Department of Visual Arts, Stainless Design Concepts, as well as entrepreneur coach Chuck Rancourt met with students and discussed their businesses.  They also detailed how to achieve careers in their fields and what skills are needed to be successful.

"Today our students have been exposed to some of the premiere businesses in the Capital Region," said Dan Liebert. "This interaction provides them with a better understanding of all that awaits them in the future and underscores the importance of what they are learning here at Tech Valley High School."

The students, who chose what sessions they wanted to sit-in on, listened intently and asked questions during the 20-minute presentations. The students rotated through three
sessions during the hour-long event.

An expert on packaging shows a productTVHS conducts three exposiums during the year to expose students to the businesses that make up Tech Valley High School and give them a better understanding of the skills needed to excel in the 21st century workplace.

Seven- to eight-companies are invited to each exposium. Companies conduct a “poster session”, making a brief presentation then answering questions, said organizer Denise Zieske.

In the top photo, an expert from AECOM explains the work his firm is doing at the site of the World Trade Center

In the bottom photo, Ashley Cox from NYSERDA explains how mushrooms are made into packaging.